THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO CAME OUT IN SUPPORT OF OUR 2ND ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL ON SUNDAY, 9/8. It was a beautiful day to celebrate the cultures which make our community amazing!

Peace and God's gift of mercy be with you!

 

Parish Mission Statement

We, at the Church of the Most Holy Name of Jesus, strive to be a vibrant, welcoming community of faith. We are unified by our participation in the liturgy, the sacraments, and service. We are a diverse family fully alive in Christ. We serve our God, our Church, and our community through effective stewardship of God’s gifts of time, talent, and treasure.

 

Thank you for visiting Holy Name's online home. Let this be another way to enter our front door as God's family and friends!

 
Guests and visitors are always welcome at our masses and events. For more information or to join our mailing list, please e-mail the parish office at info@holynamenashville.com or call us at (615) 254-8847.
 
We are located in between Nissan Stadium, (formerly LP Field), home of the Tennessee Titans, and the 5 Points area of East Nashville at 521 Woodland Street.
 

 “Living in Gratitude and Serving in Love.”

As a community of believers, we will soon renew our commitments of love and gratitude to Our God while in humble service to our parish!
 

STAY TUNED FOR MORE DETAILS!

 

Bishop's Annual Appeal for Ministries 2019

This year the Diocese will update on the progress and impact of the appeal through an e-newsletter.  Updates will be sent to subscribers around every 6 weeks.  In other words, we will not bombard anyone’s inbox. Click here to subscribe. If you would like to donate to the Appeal, click here

 

 

Headlines from Holy Name

Holy Name and Flocknote - 11/01/2018

Just a reminder to parishioners that we are now using Flocknote to update you via text and/or email. Contact Elizabeth Fielding, Outreach Coordinator, or refer to the bulletin for more information.

 

News from the Diocese

Current issue of the Tennessee Register, newspaper of the Diocese of Nashville

 

Saint of the Day

Saints Andrew Kim Taegon, Paul Chong Hasang, and Companions

Saint Andrew Kim Taegon and Companions | CNS Photo
Image: Saint Andrew Kim Taegon and Companions | CNS Photo

Saints Andrew Kim Taegon, Paul Chong Hasang, and Companions

Saint of the Day for September 20

(August 21, 1821 – September 16, 1846; Companions d. between 1839 – 1867)

 

 

Saints Andrew Kim Taegon, Paul Chong Hasang, and Companions’ Story

The first native Korean priest, Andrew Kim Taegon was the son of Christian converts. Following his baptism at the age of 15, Andrew traveled 1,300 miles to the seminary in Macao, China. After six years, he managed to return to his country through Manchuria. That same year he crossed the Yellow Sea to Shanghai and was ordained a priest. Back home again, he was assigned to arrange for more missionaries to enter by a water route that would elude the border patrol. He was arrested, tortured, and finally beheaded at the Han River near Seoul, the capital.

Andrew’s father Ignatius Kim, was martyred during the persecution of 1839, and was beatified in 1925. Paul Chong Hasang, a lay apostle and married man, also died in 1839 at age 45.

Among the other martyrs in 1839 was Columba Kim, an unmarried woman of 26. She was put in prison, pierced with hot tools and seared with burning coals. She and her sister Agnes were disrobed and kept for two days in a cell with condemned criminals, but were not molested. After Columba complained about the indignity, no more women were subjected to it. The two were beheaded. Peter Ryou, a boy of 13, had his flesh so badly torn that he could pull off pieces and throw them at the judges. He was killed by strangulation. Protase Chong, a 41-year-old nobleman, apostatized under torture and was freed. Later he came back, confessed his faith and was tortured to death.

Christianity came to Korea during the Japanese invasion in 1592 when some Koreans were baptized, probably by Christian Japanese soldiers. Evangelization was difficult because Korea refused all contact with the outside world except for taking taxes to Beijing annually. On one of these occasions, around 1777, Christian literature obtained from Jesuits in China led educated Korean Christians to study. A home Church began. When a Chinese priest managed to enter secretly a dozen years later, he found 4,000 Catholics, none of whom had ever seen a priest. Seven years later there were 10,000 Catholics. Religious freedom came to Korea in 1883.

Besides Andrew and Paul, Pope John Paul II canonized 98 Koreans and three French missionaries who had been martyred between 1839 and 1867, when he visited Korea in 1984. Among them were bishops and priests, but for the most part they were lay persons: 47 women and 45 men.


Reflection

We marvel at the fact that the Korean Church was strictly a lay Church for a dozen years after its birth. How did the people survive without the Eucharist? It is no belittling of this and other sacraments to realize that there must be a living faith before there can be a truly beneficial celebration of the Eucharist. The sacraments are signs of God’s initiative and response to faith already present. The sacraments increase grace and faith, but only if there is something ready to be increased.


Minute Meditations

The post Saints Andrew Kim Taegon, Paul Chong Hasang, and Companions appeared first on Franciscan Media.

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Celebrating 102 years of Holy Name and 162 years as the Catholic Parish of East Nashville

Anniversary Mass of Dedication, March 26, 2017
Church of the Most Holy Name of Jesus, 1917-2017
Began as the Catholic Parish of East Nashville (Edgefield), 1857

 

 
 

Mass Times 

Weekends

Saturday Vigil: 5:00 PM
Sunday: 8:00am, 10:30am
Sudanese Mass (Sundays): 12:00 PM
French Mass - 5:00pm; 3rd Sunday of each month (exceptions Easter, Pentecost and Christmas)

Check Mass Times at: https://catholicmasstime.org/

Weekdays

Communion Service: Mondays 8:00 AM
Daily Mass (Tuesday - Friday): 8:00 AM

Confessions

45 minutes before mass or by appointment. Contact the parish office at (615) 254-8847.

Holy Day Masses

Refer to the Calendar tab. Will also appear  on this side bar menu under "Upcoming Events" as events roll over. 

 

Daily Mass Readings

 

Upcoming Events

 

 


Diocese of Nashville