Peace and God's gift of mercy be with you!

 

Parish Mission Statement

We, at the Church of the Most Holy Name of Jesus, strive to be a vibrant, welcoming community of faith. We are unified by our participation in the liturgy, the sacraments, and service. We are a diverse family fully alive in Christ. We serve our God, our Church, and our community through effective stewardship of God’s gifts of time, talent, and treasure.

 

Thank you for visiting Holy Name's online home. Let this be another way to enter our front door as God's family and friends!

 
Guests and visitors are always welcome at our masses and events. For more information or to join our mailing list, please e-mail the parish office at info@holynamenashville.com or call us at (615) 254-8847.
 
We are located in between Nissan Stadium, (formerly LP Field), home of the Tennessee Titans, and the 5 Points area of East Nashville at 521 Woodland Street.
 

Kroger Community Rewards Information

We recently announced to our parishioners that Holy Name is participating in the Kroger Community Rewards Program. This year Kroger has set aside $2.5 million dollars to help support various community groups, churches, and other non-profit organizations. In order for us to benefit, we need a little help from you! You will need your Kroger Plus card or telephone number in order to participate. If you are not a Kroger Rewards member, the instructions will guide you through that process as well. (There is no fee involved.) Please click on the button below and you will be redirected to enrollment instructions. It only takes a few minutes and every time you shop, you will help our parish community! KCR document

 

Headlines from Holy Name

Month of All Saints and All Souls - 11/01/2018

This month we remember all souls of the faithful departed. In addition to Masses on 11/1 & 11/2, parishioners are encouraged to contact the parish secretary to schedule Masses for deceased loved ones and friends. Pray also for the souls in purgatory.

Holy Name and Flocknote - 11/01/2018

Just a reminder to parishioners that we are now using Flocknote to update you via text and/or email. Contact Elizabeth Fielding, Outreach Coordinator, or refer to the bulletin for more information.

Parking Lot & Grounds - No Scooters - 11/01/2018

With the increase in Bird/Lime scooters on our streets, we want to take a moment to pass along a reminder that these scooters are prohibited & trespassing on private property. Both companies have complied with requests to mark us as a "No" zone.

Office Hours Change - 09/21/2018

Effective, 9/24/18, our parish office hours will be from 9am-4pm excluding holidays and holy days of obligation.

Remembering Bishop David Choby - 06/29/2017

We have updated the memorial page for Bishop Choby. Please click on the slide in the slideshow which appears at the top of all pages on this site. Among the links you will find on the page is the Commemorative Issue of the Tennessee Register.

 

News from the Diocese

Most Rev. Mark J. Spalding, 12th Bishop of the Diocese of Nashville

Current issue of the Tennessee Register, newspaper of the Diocese of Nashville

 

Saint of the Day

Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne

Mosaic of Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne in the Cathedral Basilica in St. Louis, MO | photo by Andrew Balet
Image: Mosaic of Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne in the Cathedral Basilica in St. Louis, MO | photo by Andrew Balet

Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne

Saint of the Day for November 20

(August 29, 1769 – November 18, 1852)

 

Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne’s Story

Born in Grenoble, France, of a family that was among the new rich, Rose learned political skills from her father and a love of the poor from her mother. The dominant feature of her temperament was a strong and dauntless will, which became the material—and the battlefield—of her holiness. She entered the Visitation of Mary convent at 19, and remained despite family opposition. As the French Revolution broke, the convent was closed, and she began taking care of the poor and sick, opened a school for homeless children, and risked her life helping priests in the underground.

When the situation cooled, Rose personally rented the former convent, now a shambles, and tried to revive its religious life. The spirit was gone, however, and soon there were only four nuns left. They joined the infant Society of the Sacred Heart, whose young superior, Mother Madeleine Sophie Barat, would be her lifelong friend.

In a short time Rose was a superior and supervisor of the novitiate and a school. But since hearing tales of missionary work in Louisiana as a little girl, her ambition was to go to America and work among the Indians. At 49, she thought this would be her work. With four nuns, she spent 11 weeks at sea en route to New Orleans, and seven weeks more on the Mississippi to St. Louis. She then met one of the many disappointments of her life. The bishop had no place for them to live and work among Native Americans. Instead, he sent her to what she sadly called “the remotest village in the U.S.,” St. Charles, Missouri. With characteristic drive and courage, she founded the first free school for girls west of the Mississippi.

It was a mistake. Though Rose was as hardy as any of the pioneer women in the wagons rolling west, cold and hunger drove them out—to Florissant, Missouri, where she founded the first Catholic Indian school, adding others in the territory.

“In her first decade in America, Mother Duchesne suffered practically every hardship the frontier had to offer, except the threat of Indian massacre—poor lodging, shortages of food, drinking water, fuel and money, forest fires and blazing chimneys, the vagaries of the Missouri climate, cramped living quarters and the privation of all privacy, and the crude manners of children reared in rough surroundings and with only the slightest training in courtesy” (Louise Callan, R.S.C.J., Philippine Duchesne).

Finally at age 72, retired and in poor health, Rose got her lifelong wish. A mission was founded at Sugar Creek, Kansas, among the Potawatomi and she was taken along. Though she could not learn their language, they soon named her “Woman-Who-Prays-Always.” While others taught, she prayed. Legend has it that Native American children sneaked behind her as she knelt and sprinkled bits of paper on her habit, and came back hours later to find them undisturbed. Rose Philippine died in 1852, at the age of 83, and was canonized in 1988. The Liturgical Feast of Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne is November 18.


Reflection

Divine grace channeled Mother Duchesne’s iron will and determination into humility and selflessness, and to a desire not to be made superior. Still, even saints can get involved in silly situations. In an argument with her over a minor change in the sanctuary, a priest threatened to remove the tabernacle. She patiently let herself be criticized by younger nuns for not being progressive enough. For 31 years, she hewed to the line of a dauntless love and an unshakable observance of her religious vows.


We are all called to be saints. Click here to find out how!


Winfield Collection SOD SAINT PG FOOTER ( Nov 16-22)

[Read More]

 

 

Celebrating 101 years of Holy Name and 161 years as the Catholic Parish of East Nashville

Anniversary Mass of Dedication, March 26, 2017
Church of the Most Holy Name of Jesus, 1917-2017
Began as the Catholic Parish of East Nashville (Edgefield), 1857

 

 
 

Mass Times 

Weekends

Saturday Vigil: 5:00 PM
Sunday: 8:00am, 10:30am
Sudanese Mass (Sundays): 12:00 PM
French Mass - 5:00pm; 3rd Sunday of each month (exceptions Easter, Solemnity of Christ the King & Christmas)

Weekdays

Communion Service: Mondays 8:00 AM
Daily Mass (Tuesday - Friday): 8:00 AM

Confessions

45 minutes before mass or by appointment. Contact the parish office at (615) 254-8847.

Holy Day Masses

Posted as scheduled.

 

Daily Mass Readings

 

Upcoming Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Diocese of Nashville